Go Clean ICBC is a global coalition of organizations demanding ICBC to shift all energy finance from dirty coal to clean solar and wind power. Our message is gaining momentum, with strong resistance to ICBC’s coal funding in recipient countries like Indonesia, Kenya, Pakistan, Turkey, Vietnam, Zimbabwe. We want ICBC to make a clean break from coal.

Go Clean ICBC is a network of civil society organizations from countries where ICBC is financing coal projects. We are working to stop all of ICBC’s coal investments, which are contributing to the climate crisis. 

We work closely with local communities in those countries to expose the truth behind ICBC’s environmentally destructive projects. We believe innocent people should not be locked into decades of pollution and expensive fuels, while the rest of the world undergoes a clean energy transition. We also believe the world should not be locked into a dangerous climate future.

We provide science-backed facts for ICBC, its partners, shareholders and customers to make the right choices for a sustainable, safe, and just future for all. That means making a clean break from coal and transitioning to renewable energy sources. Our goal is to create a global movement that will help the world’s biggest bank make the biggest difference.

Latest news

Asian Peoples Movement on Debt and Development (APMDD) and Asian Energy Network’s Open Letter to ICBC

On June 23rd, grassroots groups and civil society organisations from around the world came together to ask the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC) to show real climate leadership by stopping the financing of fossil fuel projects and funding renewable energy instead. We are sharing Asian People’s Movement on Debt and Development’s open letter to ICBC

As the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China holds its Annual General Meeting, civic groups call for the bank to stop funding fossil fuels

Today the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC), one of the three financial advisors of the East African Crude Oil Pipeline (EACOP), among other fossil fuel projects, is holding its Annual General Meeting (AGM), where shareholders will be making important decisions regarding the institution’s policies and investment plans.

Time for action

On 23 June 2022, ICBC's annual general meeting will take place. We need to keep the pressure up to ensure ICBC makes the rapid switch from fossil fuels to renewables.

Sea Turtle joins the Orange Blossom Festival in Adana, Turkey

In the week of 23 March 2022, a whopping 1.5 million people gathered at the famous Orange Blossom Festival in Adana, Turkey. The most attractive guest at the gathering was a sea turtle. What does it have to do with ICBC? Read the full story below to learn more.

The Industrial and Commercial Bank of China should finance a green and low-carbon future, not the East African Crude Oil Pipeline

Members of the #StopEACOP campaign represented by 61  civil society organisations (CSOs) from Uganda, Tanzania, DR Congo and Kenya, wrote to the Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (ICBC) expressing their concerns about its role as a financial advisor and its potential participation in a $2.5 billion project finance loan for the development of the East African Crude Oil Pipeline (EACOP) project.

The future of coal plants in Pakistan

What if ICBC and other Chinese banks consider walking away from Pakistan’s coal plants?

The legal battle of Sepang Bay residents against coal-fired power plant

No one is immune to losing faith, especially when you know you are on the right side of the law and you’re up against one of the world’s biggest fossil-fuel financiers. 

Pakistan’s Thar coal project and its community’s disempowerment

In the last 12 months, the world of coal financing has shifted dramatically. Even ICBC themselves have indicated that they are moving away from the high-emissions fuel. However, for the residents of Thar, vague hopeful statements of the future will not change the real, tangible heartbreak they are going through at the moment.

Alternative Investments 

“It’s not that we don’t want development. We do. But what we want is sustainable development."

Loss of cultural heritage feared in the aftermath of halted coal plant construction

Even after the Lamu coal power plant has been abandoned, residents fear that cultural damage might already have been done